The poker blueprint на русском

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The Poker Blueprint На Русском

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Unfortunately, this impression is undercut by typographical, spelling, and grammatical errors, at least one or two of which potentially interfere with understanding. There are good, if short, discussions of how to bluff on paired boards, on monotone flops, and in multi-way pots.



The one-page glossary at the end of the book will be of little help even to those who realize it is there. Still, there is the same frustrating failure to help in identifying opponents who would be good targets for such plays: No one can help you determine which players will fold on a paired board to your aggression. In fact, even many higher stakes players could learn a thing or two from these pages.

It contains plenty of great material for players who need help beating smaller stakes online short-handed games, but I fear the often terse, jargon-laden explanations will be too confusing or overwhelming for many players who would otherwise benefit greatly from reading it.

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Basically, though, it feels more like reading an electronic version of a textbook than a Word document, which is welcome. No one can help you determine which players will fold on a paired board to your aggression. You have to try it and figure it out for yourself.

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Importantly, these include not only identification of the situation but advice about which parts of your range are best suited to making these plays. If my opponent calls 3-bets but check-fold [sic] when he misses the flop, then I will 3-bet him all day as well.



The information is valuable, no doubt, but processing and making use of it will require a lot of work on the part of the reader. There are sporadic flashes of clarity and insight like this throughout the book- a chart classifying factors like skill, all-in pots, and showdowns seen as a function of stack size comes to mind- but they are few and far-between.



On the plus side, The Poker Blueprint will probably get readers thinking about some new situations and plays. Nguyen and Davis are writing for a relatively narrow audience, a fact which in some ways they make clear up front but in some ways they do not.



The one-page glossary at the end of the book will be of little help even to those who realize it is there. Nguyen and Davis are writing for a relatively narrow audience, a fact which in some ways they make clear up front but in some ways they do not.

Still, there is the same frustrating failure to help in identifying opponents who would be good targets for such plays: Overall it comes across as hurried and somewhat disorganized, and some important concepts are presented without nuance or caveat.



If my opponent calls 3-bets but check-fold [sic] when he misses the flop, then I will 3-bet him all day as well. The information is valuable, no doubt, but processing and making use of it will require a lot of work on the part of the reader.



In fact, even many higher stakes players could learn a thing or two from these pages. Basically, though, it feels more like reading an electronic version of a textbook than a Word document, which is welcome.



In short, I fear it will be too confusing or overwhelming for many players who would otherwise benefit greatly from reading it. It is well-laid out, with good use of headers, footers, colors, card images, boxed text, and other touches that give it a professional look and welcoming, readable feel.

There are good, if short, discussions of how to bluff on paired boards, on monotone flops, and in multi-way pots.



It contains plenty of great material for players who need help beating smaller stakes online short-handed games, but I fear the often terse, jargon-laden explanations will be too confusing or overwhelming for many players who would otherwise benefit greatly from reading it.

Had Tri Nguyen and Aaron Davis published their e-book The Poker Blueprint several years ago, I would have recommended it in the strongest possible terms. It is well-laid out, with good use of headers, footers, colors, card images, boxed text, and other touches that give it a professional look and welcoming, readable feel.



Importantly, these include not only identification of the situation but advice about which parts of your range are best suited to making these plays. These come in the form of notes in shaded pull-boxes that offer warning, clarification, or reassurance.

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There is also little guidance regarding how to recognize mistakes like those mentioned here, folding too often to 3-bets or to continuation bets in 3-bet pots.

There is also little guidance regarding how to recognize mistakes like those mentioned here, folding too often to 3-bets or to continuation bets in 3-bet pots. There are sporadic flashes of clarity and insight like this throughout the book- a chart classifying factors like skill, all-in pots, and showdowns seen as a function of stack size comes to mind- but they are few and far-between.



The authors get the concepts and the material itself overwhelmingly right. Had Tri Nguyen and Aaron Davis published their e-book The Poker Blueprint several years ago, I would have recommended it in the strongest possible terms. But overall The Poker Blueprint is too cursory, informal, and disorganized in its presentation to help readers take full advantage of the valuable information it contains.

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These come in the form of notes in shaded pull-boxes that offer warning, clarification, or reassurance. To be fair, Nguyen and Davis do sometimes step outside of the rapid-fire poker lingo to consider where the reader is coming from and address potential misunderstandings and mistakes.



Overall it comes across as hurried and somewhat disorganized, and some important concepts are presented without nuance or caveat. Unfortunately, this impression is undercut by typographical, spelling, and grammatical errors, at least one or two of which potentially interfere with understanding.

Book Review: The Poker Blueprint by Tri Nguyen and Aaron Davis

In short, I fear it will be too confusing or overwhelming for many players who would otherwise benefit greatly from reading it. You have to try it and figure it out for yourself.



On the plus side, The Poker Blueprint will probably get readers thinking about some new situations and plays. The authors get the concepts and the material itself overwhelmingly right. But overall The Poker Blueprint is too cursory, informal, and disorganized in its presentation to help readers take full advantage of the valuable information it contains.





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